Tag Archives: Tyus Jones

Key Prospects Tour Duke Campus

BDN Photo

There is never a shortage of feel good moments for Duke fans when Countdown to Craziness kicks off the basketball season and on Friday night a celebration of the program ensued. Coach Mike Krzyzewski and his program had more than just this years team on display during the festivities. They also had a bevy of highly rated and key future prospects in attendance and they hope it will not be these young mens last visit to Durham.

It wasn’t long after BDN began it’s coverage of the event that all of the Duke Assistant Coaches, Jeff Capel, Chris Collins and Steve Wojociechowski came walking down the steps beside the Swartz-Butters Building which houses Coach K on the top floor with all of the visiting prospects.   Among [private] those were a point guard who does nothing but make his team better and win, Tyus Jones.

BDN Photo

Jones is believed to have Duke and Michigan State at the top of his list, so it was important that Duke made a good impression and from afar it appears that may have happened. Also attending was a 6-10 behemoth from Chicago Jahlil Okafor and a sleek wing in North Carolina native Theo Pinson. All three of these players played on one of the better Team USA Development Teams in recent memory and all know one another from the AAU circuit as well. Depending on how your perceive information, it is said that these guys along with Justise Winslow would not mind playing together in college.

Duke also had a visit from another stud prospect in Karl Towns and a junior high sensation and specimen in Harry Giles.

Anyhow, back to the walk through campus by the prospects. As they descended down the steps quite a few Duke fans took notice and trust me from the folks I met who follow or are members of BDN, a lot of them and others were well aware of these kids visits. Suddenly, there was a small mob of picture and autograph seekers and the guys took time out to accommodate the fans.

 

BDN Photo

Several minutes past before the prospects made their way fully onto the concourse with K-Ville dead ahead. By that time, owrd had spread and more Duke fans were taking notice. I could not help but think how disappointed some kids would be after getting their Duke caps and such signed for these guys not to matriculate but the greeting is one the average fan would have hoped for and a positive thing.

As they got closer to K-Ville, several groups of students, mainly coeds, held signs up letting each player know they were wanted in Durham. All of them seemed touched if not a tad embarrassed by the moment but all were certainly impressed by the situation. The group then made their way towards the Chapel and campus and later appeared behind the bench in Cameron as the event took place.

BDN Photo

All of them sat directly behind Coach Krzyzewski and he would often turn to them individually and collectively and chat of what was happening on the court or offering some nuggets of wisdom. Several times during the game you could hear their names shouted but there were never any orchestrated cheers which lasted long but each of these kids knew they were honored guests.

If body language is any indication, the group enjoyed themselves and the Duke atmosphere and there were several times where the group had collective laughs at various antics, such as Marshall Plumlee dancing with his crutches. No real information past that at this time but I sure more will come out at some point today and I will pass on what I can.   Talk about it on the BDN Premium Message Board.  [/private]

Duke Basketball Recruiting Update – Key visits taking place


In our latest premium update for members, we have new information on Tyus Jones and more. Join today and get all the latest on the recruiting trail. Photo copyright Blue Devil Nation

As many of you know, the Duke Men’s Basketball staff has been on the road for official in-home visits with many key prospects. For our members only, BDN Premium recaps the latest happenings and previews what is to come (and there is a lot) in our latest team and recruiting update.

As a refresher, let’s start by recapping the visits that have already occurred.  The first was with Semi Ojeleye, who went against the grain by not inviting the full-on media onslaught that so often accompanies these things. Ojeleye is considered a perfect fit at Duke and he knew exactly where he wanted to go after Blue Devils Coach Mike Krzyzewski gave his final presentation.

In committing to Duke, Ojeleye, of course, joins shooting guard Matt Jones in the (current) two-man Class of 2013.  Jones committed to the Blue Devils long ago, but he still received a visit last week, which we’ll recap in a later update.

The Blue Devils then checked out the Tennessee home of Austin Nichols. Nichols is as close to a prototypical Duke frontcourt player as you can get, being a 6’11” guy who can go inside/out. The worry from a few involved is that [private] Vanderbilt and Tennessee provide him an opportunity to play closer to home, and it is worth noting that his sister goes to Tennessee as well.  Many continue to mention Virginia as a player in this recruitment too, but the style of play employed in the Cavaliers’ system is a known turn-off. Nichols also raised some eyebrows when he decided not to participate with Team USA this past off-season, but that has not diminished Duke’s interest in him.  As mentioned in the last update, Duke gets an official visit with Nichols on October 6th, and the goal is to close the deal at that time or at least have a good indication of what will happen. One thing to look for is how he gets along with the players here. While Nichols is far from a sure thing, the staff does seem to feel good about him. Nichols was more of a priority for Duke than was Marcus Lee, the talented California frontcourt prospect who recently dropped the Blue Devils from his list.

Julius Randle likes Duke, but has 10 other schools currently listed as well and Kentucky making their play.

The Blue Devils also went into the home of Julius Randle, but minus the gimmicks and bling the other coaches used. This week, five more schools follow Duke, Kansas, Kentucky, and North Carolina with in-home visits, yet the puzzling thing is everybody with a pulse knows not one of these other five will make the final cut. A lot of people have been in Randle’s ear lately, and his recruitment is now the most hyped of his class. This one will go on for a long, long time, so strap yourself in for one stressful ride. I have been covering Duke recruiting for a long time, and I hoped to avoid the dog-and-pony show, but it never fails: one player changes his whole demeanor going into his senior year. It wasn’t that long ago that Randle gave four schools every indication that they would be announced as the finalists and then bam, we now have ten in-home visits? In any event, at the in-home they were straightforward with Julius as to what they have to offer and why Duke presents such a good opportunity for him, and Duke still feels they are in good shape with him.  The Blue Devils will be in it the day Randle chooses, but that day will not come until Spring.

But yes, Kentucky is in the mix in a big way and the Blue Devils cannot or will not match some of the things that Kentucky is about, offering a den of luxury and simpleton classes, easing the path for kids to coast to the League.  They are pushing the envelope to the edge with NCAA rules. They use the hip-hop culture, power personalities that show the bling and spoils of the life many only read about, and then they convince kids they’ll be in an environment that caters to their every whim. School? Really? Anyhow, Calipari and his assistant Orlando Antigua go to events like the Peach Jam, sit right in front of the NCAA Compliance people, and push the edges of the rules.  They know exactly where the boundaries are, and have found ways to use them to their advantage. Kentucky doesn’t hide the fact that they are a luxurious pit stop for prospects on their way to the NBA, and the lifestyle they offer is now swaying kids who valued education when growing up —  see Alex Poythress.  The school is at the forefront of overhyped dog-and-pony shows and in today’s culture, prospects who cannot see the bigger picture in life easily get caught up in it, making it a tough act for a school like Duke to go up against.  Until something is done and the charade is halted, Kentucky will be a regular thorn in the side of everyone involved in the recruiting process.

Justise Winslow is set to visit Duke during Countdown to Craziness. BDN Photo

Now, despite what I just said, I would not concede Julius Randle just yet. In no way do I feel BAD about Randle and Duke, but there was a time not long ago I thought the good guys were a prohibitive favorite. That in turn caused me to downplay Jabari Parker a bit, and I am not the only one who did so. The truth is Duke and other schools were asked to back off a bit on his recruitment awhile back, but they have been and will be in this one until the end as well. Despite what you have heard to date, let it go and start with a fresh take.  Duke’s in-home with the Parkers is on Friday, and it’s a big deal as Coach K will join Chris Collins to sell the Duke way and their vision for Jabari. Duke would of course take both Parker and Randle but realistically, that will not happen in the current landscape.  But they sure as heck would love to get one of them.  Expect Krzyzewski to go after both equally hard. In fact, he is doing so already.

As you know, the staff also goes to see prospects work out in open gyms. The most recent visits have been to see Trey Lyles, Justise Winslow, Karl Towns and Grayson Allen. They will continue to monitor each of them closely. Duke went to Memphis on Wednesday to watch Austin Nichols and Coach Krzyzewski will go to see Trey Lyles again today, because he wants a firsthand view.

Duke will visit Jahlil Okafor as well, now that the teachers strike in Chicago is coming under control. The Blue Devils have stayed strong with the big man and feel they’re in great shape at this time, but much work still needs to be done.

And let’s not forget the consummate winner, the outstanding point guard Tyus Jones. I got word last evening that Coach K will drop in on him today, which leads me to talk of the fast approaching Countdown to Craziness. Jones has confirmed he will visit for the affair, as will Justise Winslow, a key target in his own right.

Duke expects to get 2015 big man Karl Towns in Durham for CTC, as well as Theo Pinson, who is still on the mend from an injury. The injury to Pinson seems to have made his camp a bit more proactive, possibly out of fear of falling behind in the process. The Pinsons have taken their time with the process, but it’s getting to the point where they are starting to do some more serious looking, as well as watching more closely what other key players are doing in their recruitments.

That pretty much sums up the latest, and as always we ask that you keep the information here per contract agreement. A lot of times recruiting information is sensitive and does not belong in public forums, as those can give competitors unfair advantages. For me to continue to share information we all covet, it is important to adhere to set standards.

In closing, thanks for being a member of Blue Devil Nation Premium and supporting our efforts to bring you the best coverage available. Please let others know about us, and if you have further questions on hoops recruiting, Andrew or myself will do our best to answer them on the message board. [/private]

BDN Premium – Under Armour Elite 24 Recap

Julius Randle throws down a dunk – BDN Photo

It’s difficult to make any hard and fast judgments about players based on a game like the Elite 24, because it is a glorified pickup game, there is little defense played, and the guys are all just playing loosey-goosey and enjoying it as an end-of-summer outdoor event on the courts of Venice Beach, California. I mean, the final score was 164-138, OK? Nevertheless, there are always things to learn about guys any time you watch them, especially when playing against other elite-level players. Here’s what I saw on Saturday.

First, the “Marques Johnson” team had a huge advantage. Why? Coaching. Head coach for the squad was Duke’s own Kyrie Irving. While Kyrie spent more time on his phone texting than he did strategizing, it was good to see him out there and it was obvious how much respect he has from the guys. At halftime, he spent almost the entire time talking with uncommitted Pennsylvania forward Rondae Jefferson, but he also hung out with Julius Randle too, and they seemed to have an easy rapport as well.

OK to the game. Starting with the kids Duke is known to be recruiting heavily:

Might as well start with Julius Randle. First of all [private], he has a pro body right now. He’s been downgraded in some circles for having short arms, as that supposedly makes it harder for him to finish against length. His arms didn’t look short to me, especially when he was taking over the game in the second half, scoring five consecutive hoops en route to his game-high 27 on 13 of 14 shooting. He also has a very good handle for a guy his size, and likes to utilize it. When he does so and gets into the lane, he’s so big that the defense just sort of parts for him because they know they’re not going to stop that freight train. In real games, of course, guys will step in and try to take a charge, and he’s going to have to adjust to that. But seeing his game and his body, I don’t think he’d have any trouble playing some 5 in college if his team needed him to, though PF will obviously be his primary position.

Justise Winslow also has a very solid body and is much more athletic than I anticipated. He led his team with 21 points and scored them in a variety of ways. He drove to the hoop, he pulled up for short jumpers, he got put-back dunks, and he got out on the break (though everyone did in this game!) for some throw-downs as well. One thing I really liked was Winslow D-ing up one-on-one against stud guard Aaron Harrison and forcing Harrison to retreat after attempting to drive, and then to take a very difficult three-pointer instead. Justise took on that challenge, even in a game like this, and won it.

Marcus Lee out of California is a real string bean. He’s 6’9″ or so, but there’s no meat on the bones at all. He has excellent hops and blocks shots very well, including a big one Saturday against Kuran Iverson right at the rim and another on Austin Nichols as well. But Marcus didn’t display any offensive game at all, scoring only one point in a game in which his team scored 138. He looks like he’ll be better defensively in college than Casey Sanders was, but his body type and his lack of offensive game reminds me of Sanders, including when he airballed a free throw.

When you watch Tyus Jones play, you can tell the Minnesota point guard is an outstanding player. No. Better than that. He’s a special player. But he didn’t have his best game on Saturday. His handle wasn’t as crisp as it usually is, and he never really fully got into the flow of the action. One thing I did note is that when he and Andrew Harrison went one-on-one on a couple of occasions, Tyus seemed to have a hard time staying in front of Harrison when he went to the hoop, but at the other end Harrison bodied up on Jones and made him take tougher shots on his drives. But I wouldn’t be concerned about Jones at all, especially given the setting. The kid is a flat-out stud ballplayer, and Duke would be very fortunate to get him.

Austin Nichols, 6’8″ out of Memphis, impressed me with his athleticism and his body. This kid is not skinny at all. He’s not rocked up to the degree of a Wayne Selden or Justise Winslow, but he has some mass to him, and he’s going to gain more weight this year. He can jump too, though, and he runs the floor very well. He has good hands and finishes well. He didn’t shoot many outside jumpers in this game — not many of the kids did — so I couldn’t evaluate that, but what I did see of his game, I liked.

Other quick takes:

I thought the best player on the floor was 6’7″ Aaron Gordon out of San Jose. This dude has it all. His handle is very smooth, he’s got a strong body, he can shoot it, and he jumps out of the gym. If there was a gym. He wowed the crowd with a series of spectacular dunks midway through this game, and scored his 25 points in a variety of ways. The whole crowd was talking about him all day.

Carolina signee Nate Britt has a real good handle, but his lefty shot is awkward. And he shoots too much, or at least did in this game.

I really like the Harrison brothers out of Texas. Andrew is the point guard, and he has a very smooth handle and gets to the rim at will. He reminded me a little of Will Avery, but maybe even a little quicker. Both brothers are highly athletic but seemed to have kind of a strange affect out there, like they weren’t that engaged. Well, Aaron was engaged enough to score 25 points on 11 of 14 shooting, so I guess he was paying enough attention to do that. Really, though, these twins are killer ballplayers.

Uncommiteds Jabari Bird out of California and Kuran Iverson are both long, athletic, and active, and they both jump very well. While he’s a couple of inches shorter, Iverson, with his body type and his style, reminds a little of Kevin Garnett. A little.  [/private]

Big Time PG Prospect Tyus Jones talks hoops with BDN

Few positions in sports are able to control the tempo of a game like a point guard can. For some, speed is the key, while others like to slow the game down completely. Players such as Tyus Jones have the ability to change the pace back and forth, constantly keeping the defender on his toes. Jones has a feel for the game that is far beyond his years.

For Jones the attention he receives is nothing new. His local university, Minnesota, has been recruiting him since the eighth grade, and he has built a great relationship with Tubby Smith and his staff.

The Apple Valley product won a Gold medal this summer with the U17 Team USA squad in Lithuania. He had the chance to share the experience with close friends Justise Winslow and Jahlil Okafor.

Jones gave BDN a few minutes to discuss his summer and his recruitment, among other topics.

BlueDevilNation: Take me over your summer and how you think it went.

Tyus Jones: I think the summer’s gone very well so far. I enjoyed [private] myself this summer. I had a blast this summer and traveling and everything like that and I think I played well. I think I improved. I don’t think I have any choice but to improve. You know, with the level of competition being as high as it is. So, you know, I enjoyed myself.

BDN: Do you feel you there is a difference in your role in AAU and high school?

TJ: You know, my AAU role, I think the games are different. Minnesota high school ball doesn’t have a shot clock so there’s not as many shots. Some teams will more slow it down and things like that but I think I still have a similar role. I got to score, but at the same time distribute the ball and get my teammates involved. So I think, my AAU team and high school team, I play a similar role.

BDN: You obviously had a great opportunity this summer to travel to the Canary Islands and Lithuania. How do you think that experience changed you?

TJ: It was great, it was great. You know the experience was unbelievable to go to a different country and see what their culture is like and how they do things over there. You know even the game of basketball over there, the fans, and just everything is different. So it was a great learning experience. But, you know, we had fun and played well over there.

BDN: Was there one major difference in the culture that you noticed?

TJ: All of their stuff is more compact. You know, the rooms are real small, restaurants and stores are all real small. You sit real close together. So everything was just compact.

BDN: Compared to here where most things are more open and spread out.

TJ: Yeah, exactly. We were able to walk everywhere there.

BDN: You also had a chance to watch the Team USA Men’s team when you got back. Can you go over that experience?

TJ: That was just crazy. To be in the room of the world’s best of the best right now. It didn’t even feel real. It was a great experience. We were very thankful that they gave us the opportunity to do that, and it was great to see even at that level how focused and intense those guys are.

BDN: What, if anything, did you notice about the players’ interaction with each other? Coaches?

TJ: One of the main things you notice is how much respect the players have for Coach K and the assistants. A lot of times you might think NBA players are on top, so they might not want to hear what coaches had to say, but they were tuned in, respectful and listened to anything they had to say. They were still learning the game, which is good to see.

BDN: Can you go over who’s recruiting you right now?

TJ: University of Minnesota, Ohio State, Michigan State, Baylor, Kentucky, Duke, North Carolina, Kansas.

BDN: Regarding Duke, obviously Coach K coaches the national team. Is that something that players either talk about to each other or take into heavy consideration?

TJ: I think everything goes into consideration. I think you look at every aspect of it, whether it be big or little. So it’s definitely something you look at and it could vary from player to player how big of an aspect that is from a college standpoint. But yeah, you definitely notice it.

BDN: Does it make any difference to you that he wasn’t able to be there to recruit in July?

TJ: No, I talked to him a little bit right before they left and I was still in contact with their assistant coaches. Obviously he had a much more important (laughs) job so you can’t really hold that against a coach or anything.

BDN: Tell me about the local school, Minnesota, that’s been recruiting you for awhile.

TJ: Oh I’ve got a good relationship with Tubby Smith and his staff. They’ve been recruiting me for awhile since I was an eighth grader, so we’ve gotten close since I’ve known them. They had a good run at the end of the year last year which is good to see.

BDN: Do you have any upcoming visits that are planned?

TJ: As of now I don’t have any officially planned out. I’m going to try and do some in the fall, I’m not sure to where.

BDN: Try and make a Midnight Madness event?

TJ: Yeah, I think so. I’m not sure to where though, but yeah I’m going to try and make some.

BDN: Reading a previous interview with you, I read that you said you wanted to become more vocal during the summer. Do you feel like you accomplished that?

TJ: I did, I did. It’s just something I think a point guard has to have, along with coaches think a point guard has to have. You have to be able to communicate. Communication on a team is key and the point guard being the leader out there on the floor, it starts with them. I tried to focus on that and I think my vocal leadership improved.

BDN: Thanks a lot for your time.

TJ: No problem, thank you. [/private]

Elite 24 logo

Elite 24 Coverage of Duke Prospects on BDN Premium

Team BDN is in place in California where we are covering the Elite 24 for Premium members.  Get all the latest updates from today’s practice and Saturday’s game by joining today!  Several key Duke prospects are playing in the prestigious event, including Tyus Jones, Justise Winslow, Julius Randle, Marcus Lee and Austin Nichols, so you do not want to miss the action!  Join BDN Premium today and discuss the latest happenings with fellow members on the BDN Premium Message Board.

And Justise For All: The Justise Winslow Interview

6’6″ Duke Recruit Justise Winslow, Photo by Andrew Slater

In the well air-conditioned Durango High School gym in a city with the dry heat of a sauna, Las Vegas, 6’6″ Justise Winslow ended his summer in fitting fashion, with a championship trophy and an ankle wrap filled with enough ice to keep the Kennedy clan refreshed for a night in Palm Beach. Winslow’s AAU team, Houston Hoops, won the Las Vegas Classic 54-53 in overtime over the Mac Irvin Fire, a Chicago-based AAU program. Despite injuring his ankle in three games prior, Justise prevailed and defended all five positions, including fronting one of his best friends, 6’11” Jahlil Okafor, in the title game of the Las Vegas Classic.

A year after not making the USA Basketball U-16 team in Colorado Springs, CO, the determined Houstonian Winslow not only made the United States Men’s World Championship U-17 squad, but played such an integral role on the squad that he made the All-World Championship U-17 team in Kaunas, Lithuania. Justise, a resilient young man, roomed with Jahlil Okafor of Chicago, Tyus Jones of Apple Valley, Minnesota, and BeeJay Anya of Gaithersburg, Maryland. Bringing efficient decision-making, defensive versatility, toughness, explosive athleticism, an on-court tenacity and maturity, Winslow started the last five games for the United States, registering four consecutive double-doubles at one stretch. In the championship game against Australia, the rising junior scored thirteen points, grabbed eleven rebounds, and generated four steals to help the team capture the coveted gold medal. Soon after, the gold medal-winning team was flown more than fifty-seven hundred miles away to Sin City, watching the United States Men’s team prepare for the Olympics. Justise was able to meet with the Olympic team members and observe Coach K run a practice and scrimmage against the USA Select team. Less than two weeks later, the four-time NCAA Champion head coach would offer Justise Winslow a full scholarship to Duke University.

The MVP of the World Championship and fellow Duke recruit Jahlil Okafor said of Justise, “Justise Winslow is an amazing player. He’s one of my best friends. He’s a freak athlete. He can shoot it, he can dribble, and he’s like 6’6.” He’s really strong and a tremendous defender. He’s an amazing player. He was my roommate and, so, we obviously hung out a lot. You know how we’re both really humble. We’re like-minded. We’re both very serious basketball players. We don’t listen to all the other stuff influence us. We have a lot in common. We’re both just very focused on basketball and improving.”

St. John’s School in Houston, an academically rigorous institution with an average SAT score more than 130 points higher than the incoming freshman class at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, had not won a basketball title in thirty-two years. In his first year of high school, Justise helped add a banner to the rafters by scoring a career-high forty-three points, grabbing fourteen rebounds, and making the game-winning assist to his older brother Josh in the waning seconds of the championship game against the Episcopal School of Dallas to win 69-67.

Following the loss of ten seniors from the first title-winning team in three decades, the Mavericks of St. John’s had some initial growing pains, including Justise receiving a controversial ejection from a December game after a crowd-electrifying dunk against Antonian Prep of San Antonio. Once again, however, Winslow, a now sixteen year-old with the physique of a young defensive end in football and the reserved demeanor of a fourteen-year veteran NBA player, willed St. John’s, alma mater of director Wes Anderson, to a second consecutive Southwest Preparatory Title, registering a near triple-double of twenty-five points, ten rebounds, and eight assists, against arch-rival Kincaid in the title game. For the season, the southpaw earned MaxPreps Sophomore All-American distinction, after averaging 22.5 points, 11.4 rebounds, and 3.2 assists en route to a second consecutive Southwest Preparatory Title.

Justise Winslow of Houston Hoops, Photo by Andrew Slater

The son of Rickie Winslow, a member of the University of Houston’s famed Phi Slamma Jamma, who played professionally in the NBA as well as in Europe, and fellow Cougar Robin Davis, Justise’s statistics belied the overall importance that he played on this year’s Houston Hoops team. The rising junior averaged 9.8 points, 4.6 rebounds, and 3.5 assists, while shooting 51.4% from the field in the Nike EYBL regular season, but, infused with the confidence of his success in Lithuania, took his game to another level  at the Peach Jam in North Augusta, SC, where he averaged sixteen points, over eight rebounds and three assists in five games against a superior level of EYBL competition.

His head coach with the Houston Hoops, which also produced McDonald’s All-American and incoming Duke freshman Rasheed Sulaimon, is Tim Schumacher. Coach Schumacher said of Justise, “He’s a phenomenal kid. He’s a phenomenal athlete, which is obvious, but he’s also a high IQ basketball player. When you put those things together, the great personality, the great work ethic, and the phenomenal athlete, I mean the sky is the limit for Justise. He’s really got the ingredients to be a very special player.”

Of Justise’s experience with both making and achieving a high level of success with USA Basketball, Coach Schumacher continued, “Well, I think it was great for Justise because he didn’t make the team for the sixteen-and-under and he was really disappointed about that. He really spent about a year with that as his goal and the fact that he achieved his goal and then, when he was there, he had so much success, it really gave him a lot of confidence and swagger, which I think he needed to get. He’s so unselfish and he makes all of the right decisions to such a point that, as a coach, I sometimes want him to be more selfish. Sometimes, I want him to be more aggressive with ball because he is so good. He’s a very efficient player. With his work ethic, the better that his jump shot gets, the higher that his game is going to go.”

Justise Winslow spoke with me in Las Vegas and Oakland about a wide array of topics, including his new offer from Duke University, his gold medal-winning experience with USA Basketball, what he’s looking for in a college program, his father’s advice, and his relationship with Jahlil Okafor.

 

Let’s start with the most recent championship run.

Well, coming from Peach Jam, we went four and one, but didn’t make it out of the pool. Here, we just played with a chip on our shoulder. It was a lot of fun to be able to play and win with some of these guys…some of them we’ll never play again with. We just got the job done.

[private]

Now, in retrospect, talk about the strength of this team, the wings and its versatility.

Yeah, I mean we had a lot of versatile players playing with us. Some of them were playing with us for the first time like DeAndre and James, but, you know, we found a way to get it done. At the end of the day, that’s what it all comes down to.

Then, today, in this game specifically..

Yeah, I struggled a little bit with..

Well, you had that great play along the baseline…

Yeah, I had that dunk, but I struggled a little bit with Jahlil’s size down low. He’s a great shot-blocker. So, that’s why I need to go home and work on finishing at the basket, hitting that mid-range pull-up, and stuff like that so that, in these types of games, I can become more useful when I’m on the floor.

Well, you’re obviously quite useful, but what happened with your ankle?

It’s hurt. It actually hurts a lot.

Was that from before this game?

Yeah, it intensified in this game, but it really started about three games back. There’ll be plenty of time to rest it.

Oh, I’m sorry to hear that.

Yeah, yeah. Thanks.

What was your experience like both playing with USA Basketball and making the team this year?

That was a great experience being able to make that team and then being able to play alongside all of those high-major caliber players. It was a once in a lifetime experience..being able to be so young and be able to travel the country with so many great players.

You guys were rock stars.

Yeah, and, you know, when we won, I was just so happy and it was because everyone was going for the team. Everyone was playing for a common goal, which was to win the gold medal and so it was really a great experience generally. I’m really proud of that.

To a degree, it was really your coming out party internationally. You really set yourself apart through your physicality and versatility.

Well, when I went out there, the coaches told me that my role was just to play hard and to rebound. I just took that and ran with it. You know that I got a lot of opportunities through transition buckets by hustling and through our press. Also, I tried to help through not allowing the other team to get buckets. I really just tried to play my role and fortunately it turned out well for all of us. It was a blessing.

Who did you room with over there?

I roomed with Jahlil Okafor, Tyus Jones, and BeeJay Anya over there.

Jahlil had mentioned that. I asked him for a scouting report on you and he’s also very close with Tyus (Jones). What’s your relationship like with them?

Yeah, I mean we’re very close and, frankly, us three are looking at going to the same school together.

Is that fairly serious?

Yes, it’s serious. We’ve talked about what schools we like and stuff like that, but..

They’re good kids.

Yeah, and I really enjoy being around them. They’re some of my best friends and they’re not from my city or even state. I like them a lot.

Good taste. Now, the other major thing since we last spoke was that Duke offered you a scholarship.

When I got back from Lithuania, once I got to Vegas..

I was actually there that day and ran into Jahlil.

Oh, yeah.

It was crazy.

Yeah, yeah, definitely. So we saw Coach K that day, you know, working, but the day before I spoke with the assistant coach and he told me that they were going to be offering me pretty soon or, well, he actually texted me.

Coach Capel or Coach James?

Coach Capel..and so a couple of days later, Coach K called me once I got back home and offered me a scholarship.

And what was your initial reaction?

I mean I was ecstatic to be offered a scholarship from a high-major school like that with a lot of tradition and one of the greatest coaches ever. It was really a blessing.

What do you know about them?

I just know the tradition and how good of a coach that Coach K is and how many NBA players that they have produced. Also, it’s a great academic school.

I remember that you go to a great high school academically as well in St. John’s.

Yes, it is.

Do you have any visits planned?

On August tenth, I’ll visit UCLA.

Anything else?

No, not yet.

In terms of your overall timeline, do you view this as still early in the process? Middle? Late?

It’s transitioning to the middle. I’m trying to decide by Christmas of my senior year.

I know that you had an extensive list to start with. Are you planning on cutting that down to a more manageable number in the near future?

Yeah, I’m trying to narrow it down to ten by the early Fall.

Ten. Do you view this as the best basketball that you’ve played so far in your life?

I mean I think I can play better.

In the future, sure, but as of this point..

I think that my jump shot is better than I’ve shown. I just need to focus on improving..

Actually, efficiency, recognizing what is working in a given game, and playing within yourself are some strengths that you have that are usually developed through experience by older players. I think those are some of the distinguishing strengths of yours. What is your mindset?

I mean I just start off each game with the mindset that I need to score. If I’m not making jump shots, then I’m not going to take them unless I’m open. I’m going to try to either find an open shooter, drive for a closer shot, or look to finish around the basket.

I assume that your shooting is one of the main things that you’re trying to work on.

Yeah, I focus a lot on my jump shooting. The crazy thing is that back home, whenever I’m in school ball, I can make everything. I can make my jump shots consistently, but, for whatever reason, out here, I just can’t make them.

I’ve seen your crazy numbers and they clearly indicate that you’re capable of it.

Yeah, I just try to not let it get to my head and just think that the next one is going in.

Now, do you work with your brother? Your father?

Yeah, my brother, my father, and Coach John Lucas.

Oh, John Lucas. That’s quite a trio. What’s been your father’s advice? Obviously, he was successful in college and had a professional career.

Well, one of the main things that he keeps telling me is to just keep playing. Don’t focus necessarily on an individual play. Know that the next shot is going to go in.

Does he often guide you? I’m trying to figure out the relationship dynamics.

He guides me, but..

Does he take a backed-off approach?

Yeah, he sort of backs off because he’s been through it all. I would say that my mom is more involved with, for example, the recruitment right now.

What are their thoughts right now with what you accomplished with USA Basketball?

My mom is very proud of me. My dad is too. Well, my whole family really. She just wants me to stay humble, not get a big head, and keep working on my game.

Great advice. What are your goals for next season? You’ve had two successful runs. What are your goals, both collectively as a team and individually for the next high school season?

I mean we won our state championship for the last two years and so that is definitely our first goal. We’d like to win more games during the regular season as well too. As far as me, I’d just like to keep playing my game and then, hopefully, during my senior year, I’d really like to be a McDonald’s All-American. I just want to make my teammates better. I’d like be able to help showcase them and I’d like to be able to play in and compete in national tournaments.

I know that you had seven sophomores this year. Do you have a fairly loaded team next year?

No, not really.

Sorry about that. For the audience members that have never seen you play before, can you describe your overall game? You’re about 6’5″..

Yeah, I’m about 6’6″ 212 pounds. I’ve got pretty good size arms for a guard. I can play the point, well, really the one, two, three or four really. I can guard all of those positions. I’m athletic. I can handle the ball. I can knock down my jump shots. I can protect the rim and rebound.

Do you work on strength and conditioning as well?

Yeah, I do a bunch of drills..some simple conditioning drills like jumping over hurdles and things like that.

I think that there are so many young people that don’t focus on that aspect until it’s much later and wind up using up their first year of college to prepare themselves physically for the next level.

Yeah, exactly, I’m preparing now so that I’ll be prepared to contribute early. I’m definitely focusing on all aspects.

You’ve won two state titles already.

Yeah, it’s been cool. It definitely helped me grow as a player. It was just fun being able to do it with two different teams and to be able to win it with my friends.

On the first one, you were able to win it with your brother.

Yeah, that was really cool.

You had forty-three points, drove the lane at the end, and dished it down low to your older brother to make the game-winning bucket.

Yeah, that was great to be able to share it with him.

I read in one interview that you actually really liked football, but that it was obviously a necessary sacrifice.

Yeah, I mean I really like football and all that, but basketball is just a better sport for me.

You had also suffered a concussion earlier when you were going against some NBA guys.

Yeah, I did unfortunately. I mean they’re just bigger guys and one of them just knocked me around when I was younger.

Who was the guy that did it to you?

I think it was Gerald Green.

Your father went to the University of Houston and was part of that Phi Slamma Jamma. What would you say that you’ve gotten most from your father?

I would say my athleticism. That and he always says to remain humble.

Your high school, St. John’s, is regarded as one of the best in the country academically.

Yeah, it’s a challenge. It’s definitely a challenge to balance the academics and athletics, but it’s one that I can handle.

Has it been difficult to balance the two?

It’s definitely been necessary to learn how to balance the two. It’s difficult, but I like the challenge.

What’s your relationship like with your AAU roommate Justin Jackson?

We work out together on occasion, but we’re not too close. We’re getting along better.

Do you plan on visiting Duke?

I don’t know if we definitely have a visit planned, but I know that one of my coaches has been talking to them.

What are you looking for in a program, whenever you do decide?

The coach. I’d like a really coach and a comfortable environment.

Unselfishness is something that repeatedly comes up when I talk to others about you.

Yeah, I guess that I’m pretty unselfish. I mean it’s in my nature, but my coaches often’ll say that I need to be more selfish out there on the court. I don’t know. I guess it’s something that I need to work on or balance. It’s not something that I think about too much when I just play, but I guess I’m unselfish.

On the AAU circuit, part of it was out of necessity, but you’ve played a lot of point guard and created some mismatches for your opponents. How about playing the point guard position at the next level?

I think I’d need to work on my ball-handling a lot more.

What has been your primary role on this Houston Hoops team?

Leader

The leader?

Yes.

From your perspective, what went on the time that you were thrown out of the game after dunking the ball?

I dunked on this guy. The ref said that I looked upset at him. I didn’t say anything. Then, they gave me a tech. I said I didn’t say anything and then he ejected me.

Another adjective description that comes up with you is efficient.

Yeah, I try not to take bad shots. If a teammate has a better shot, I try to get it to them and they should take it. I try to make the shots  that I can and move the ball when I can’t. If I’m not feeling it in a given game, I’ll try to drive to the basket more.

What do you consider your strengths and weaknesses?

I would say that my strengths are probably my athleticism and my IQ and my weakness is probably my jump shooting.

What would you like the audience to know about you away from the court?

I’m a fun guy. I’m pretty serious on the court, but I like to have fun away from it.

Is there a player that you try to model your game after?

Probably James Harden

James Harden. Well, he’s a similar size.Were you a fan of any teams growing up? I thought I heard that you were.

Yeah, Florida and the University of Texas football teams.

That’s what I thought, but no basketball ones.

Yeah, no.

Who’s been the toughest guy that you’ve had to guard so far?

I’m not sure, probably Tyus Jones.

Tyus Jones. Well, thank you very much, Justise.

Sure thing, no problem.

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